Tag Archives: featured content

CDFW Warden Lost Home In Camp Fire; Finds Wife’s Wedding Ring

 

During  time of tragedy, loss and destruction, the Camp Fire, which has all but decimated the community of Paradise, a California Department of Fish and Wildlife officer and his family lost their home  but found a glimpse of hope in the rubbage.

Here’s more from San Francisco’s KTVU:

California Game Warden Jake Olsen said he found his wife’s wedding ring while inspecting the damage at their Paradise property. His wife said she left it on their kitchen counter top. That was his only clue. 

“It’s just amazing,” Olsen said, describing how he started digging. “I just didn’t think we were going to find it, but we had to try.

You can contribute to a GoFund Me page for Olsen and his family here.

 

 

Commercial Dungeness Crab Season Delayed North Of Bodega

The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: 

California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Director Charlton H. Bonham has delayed the opening of the commercial Dungeness crab fishery from Bodega Head, Sonoma County north to the Sonoma/Mendocino county line. The commercial Dungeness crab fishery south of this area will open as scheduled on Thursday, Nov. 15.

State health agencies determined that Dungeness crab in state waters from Bodega Head, Sonoma County north to the Sonoma/Mendocino county line have elevated levels of domoic acid and recommended a delay of the commercial fishery in this area.

The commercial delay includes ocean waters from the southern boundary of Bodega Head State Marine Reserve, Sonoma County (38° 18’ N. latitude) north to the Sonoma/Mendocino county line (38° 46.125’ N. latitude). Commercial take and/or possession of Dungeness crab is prohibited in these waters. North of the Sonoma/Mendocino county line, the Dungeness crab commercial season is not scheduled to open until Dec. 1. That opener is also subject to delay pending test results both for domoic acid as well as crab quality.

The area south of the southern boundary of the Bodega Head State Marine Reserve, Sonoma County to the California/Mexico border will open at 12:01 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, to be preceded by an 18-hour gear setting period that would begin no earlier than 6:01 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 14.

This delay shall remain in effect until the Director of the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), in consultation with the State Public Health Officer at the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), determines that domoic acid no longer poses a significant risk to public health and recommends opening the fishery in this region. CDFW will continue to coordinate with CDPH and OEHHA to test domoic acid levels in Dungeness crab to determine when the Dungeness crab commercial fishery in this area can safely be opened.

Once a positive determination is made to open the fishery, CDFW may provide the fleet a minimum of 72-hour advance notice announcing when trap gear can be set.

Additional information on the commercial Dungeness fishery can be found here.

The recreational fishery for Dungeness crab opened in most areas of the state on Nov. 3 under a health warning issued by CDPH for Dungeness crab caught in Sonoma County. The recreational fishery remains closed in state waters from Patrick’s Point in Humboldt County north due to elevated levels of domoic acid.

Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by a naturally occurring marine alga, whose levels can be increased under certain ocean conditions, and can accumulate in shellfish, other invertebrates and sometimes fish. It causes illness and sometimes death in a variety of birds and marine mammals that consume affected organisms. At low levels, domoic acid exposure can cause nausea, diarrhea and dizziness in humans. At higher levels, it can cause persistent short-term memory loss, seizures and death.

For more information:

Memo from Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment(11/9/2018)

CDFW Director’s Closure Declaration (11/9/2018)

2018-19 Frequently Asked Questions for the Commercial Dungeness Crab Fishery (11/9/2018)

www.wildlife.ca.gov/Fishing/Ocean/Health-Advisories

www.wildlife.ca.gov/crab

Fighting For Fish? Not Yet Per California Leaders

 (CDFW photo)

California has far worse circumstances to deal with today, but the state’s water fight isn’t close to being resolved. In fact, it’s probably a little more testy as the midterm elections came and went. Gov. Jerry Brown and his successor, Gavin Newsom, agreed to postpone a proposal that would protect the state’s native fish species. Here’s more from the Sacramento Bee: 

Gov. Jerry Brown and incoming Gov. Gavin Newsom have waded in one of California’s fiercest water wars, prompting state regulators to delay a key vote on a proposal meant to help struggling salmon and steelhead trout.

In a letter Tuesday to the California State Water Resources Board, Brown and Newsom urged it to postpone consideration of proposed regulations to give the various factions involved time to reach an agreement during confidential settlement talks.

The board was scheduled Wednesday to vote on a plan that would leave up to 40 percent of the water in lower San Joaquin River and its tributaries in their channels to benefit struggling fish. The move would mean more water will flow to the Pacific Ocean rather than be captured by dams or shunted into canals to grow crops and supply cities such as Modesto and San Francisco.

The Golden Gate Salmon Association also responded to the news:

Background:  On November 7 the State Water Resources Control Board voted to delay, again, a critical vote to improve flow conditions on the San Joaquin River and its tributaries. The Board delayed that vote for at least 30 days.  

For 22 years, the existing State Water Board flow standards have failed to stop the slow collapse of the Bay-Delta ecosystem, the great Central Valley rivers that feed it, its many fish species and the California salmon fishing industry.  For almost a decade, the Water Board has been working on new river flow requirements.  In 2010, they found that the scientific evidence overwhelmingly calls for a significant increase in flow in the Bay-Delta rivers.   Over the past decade, water users have had ample time to negotiate a credible, broadly supported settlement as an alternative to new Board flow protections. 

On October 30, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a resolution calling for the Water Board to vote on November 7.  At that meeting, SFPUC General Manager Harlan Kelly told the Board of Supervisors that he was “comfortable” with Supervisor Peskin’s resolution calling for the Water Board to vote on proposed standards.  Then, two days later, he reneged, opposed the resolution that he had supported, and persuaded the mayor to veto it.   

Quote from John McManus, President of the Golden Gate Salmon Association:  “California lost a historic chance to heal a great environmental wound that is diverting Central Valley rivers and choking the life out of them, including our salmon runs. Instead of voting to restore rivers, the Water Board kicked the can down the road, just as its predecessors did in the 1980s and 1990s when Governors Deukmejian and Wilson forced the State Board to withdraw previous proposed river flow standards at the 11th hour. Delay means death to salmon, the loss of fishing jobs, likely extinctions and the collapse of the largest estuary on the West Coast.  I doubt that the Board will act to restore our rivers in 30 days, but I sure hope I’m wrong.  

“There is a lot of bullying going on in our country now and yesterday, the State Water Board was bullied into throwing the environment and the fishing industry under the bus.  It should be noted that two members of the Water Board refused to go along with it.

“Nobody should be fooled into believing that the “grand bargain” promised at the Board meeting yesterday is real.   Water diverters involved in those negotiations testified that they don’t have an agreement and that they still reject the basic science developed by the state.

“The SFPUC played a uniquely dark role in what happened here after double-crossing the San Francisco Board of Supervisors last week.” 

Tickets Still Available For Friday’s Sonoma Salmon Fundraiser

Photos by Nancy Rodriguez

The following is courtesy of the Golden Gate Salmon Association:

San Francisco – The Golden Gate Salmon Association (GGSA) will host its fifth annual Sonoma Salmon Dinner on Friday, Nov. 9 at Ramekins Culinary Institute. The dinner will honor Sonoma County Water Agency’s General Manager, Grant Davis while raising funds to support GGSA’s work restoring salmon.

The event will be held at Ramekins Culinary Institute, 450 West Spain St, Sonoma.

This year’s event is on the heels of the enormous success of last year’s dinner where over $60,000 was raised with half of it going to local fire relief efforts.

John McManus, president of GGSA said, “We’re honoring Grant Davis because of the great job he’s done of managing Sonoma County’s water resources while protecting salmon and the local watersheds they rely on. We’re also looking forward to coming together to raise money for GGSA’s long-term goal of rebuilding the salmon runs that support coastal communities up and down the coast, including Sonoma County’s.”

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and tickets are $125.00 per seat or $1250 for reserved tables of 10. Tickets are available by calling 855-251-GGSA (4472) or by visiting https://sonoma-salmon-celebration.eventbrite.com or www.goldengatesalmon.org.

The night will feature fresh-caught salmon prepared on the fire pit.   Ted Wilson of and Kyle Kuklewski, of Ramekins will come together to elevate the culinary treats of the evening. Fresh oysters will be provided by Drakes Bay Oyster Company.  Live auction bidders can compete for trips including ocean fishing, an overnight and boat at Caples Lake Resort in the high sierras, Mendocino stay, PlumpJack Squaw Valley overnight and dinner plus other exciting wine lots and fun.

The night will also feature wines, cocktails, silent and open auctions, and the chance to compare fall harvest stories while raising funds to support GGSA’s work to keep abundant salmon stocks in California. Attendees will get a brief update from GGSA on the current state of salmon affairs.

The Golden Gate Salmon Association (goldengatesalmonassociation.org) is a coalition of salmon advocates that includes commercial and recreational salmon fishermen, businesses, restaurants, a native tribe, environmentalists, elected officials, families and communities that rely on salmon. The Golden Gate Salmon Association (www.goldengatesalmonassociation.org) is a coalition of salmon advocates that includes commercial and recreational salmon fisherman, businesses, restaurants, a native tribe, environmentalists, elected officials, families and communities that rely on salmon. GGSA’s mission is to restore California’s largest salmon runs in the Central Valley rivers because they provide the bulk of salmon caught off our coast and inland rivers. We serve the sport and commercial anglers that rely on salmon as a long-term, sustainable resource. Salmon recovery is our passion.

Upland Bird Hunting Seasons Get Cranking This Weekend

The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: 

California’s fall hunting season hits full stride Saturday, Nov. 10 with openers for wild pheasant, fall turkey and the second dove season.

Combined with hunting seasons already open for quail, chukar, snipe, waterfowl, tree squirrel and rabbits, California hunters have plenty of options to pursue some spectacular game species and equally stellar table fare. Few states can match the sheer variety of hunting opportunities available to California hunters in the fall.

Both a valid hunting license and upland game bird stamp/validation are needed to hunt pheasant, turkey and dove. An upland stamp/validation is not required for junior license holders but all hunters are required to have a Harvest Information Program (HIP) validation when hunting migratory game birds.

Ring-necked Pheasant

Since 2012, CDFW has funded scientific research into California’s wild pheasant decline using money from the purchase of upland game bird stamps/validations. The latest findings point to a combination of factors that include changing agricultural crops, upland habitat loss, predation, competition from other species, warming temperatures and pesticides as contributing to the pheasant decline in recent years.

Still, the wild pheasant opener on the second weekend of November remains a popular tradition for many families and an important economic event for some rural communities.

The good news is that some of the best remaining wild pheasant habitat in California is found on state wildlife areas and federal wildlife refuges open to public hunting. Bagging a wild rooster pheasant requires dedication, knowledge and skill, but the end reward makes unmatched table fare.

Several CDFW Type A wildlife areas are especially popular with wild pheasant hunters, including Upper Butte Basin, Gray Lodge, Grizzly Island, Yolo Bypass, Los Banos and North Grasslands.

These areas are all open to pheasant hunting on their normal Saturday, Sunday and Wednesday waterfowl hunt days. The Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area and the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area will remain open the first Monday of the pheasant season – Nov. 12 – to provide additional hunter opportunities.

Type A wildlife areas in the San Joaquin Valley – Los Banos, Mendota, North Grasslands and the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge – will be open for pheasant hunting on Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays only during the pheasant season.

Three popular northern California federal refuges – Colusa National Wildlife Refuge, Delevan National Wildlife Refuge and Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge – and one San Joaquin Valley federal refuge – Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge – will be open to pheasant hunting the first Monday of the season in addition to their normal Saturday, Sunday and Wednesday shoot days.

The Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge and the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern California, home to some of the most robust wild pheasant populations in the state, are open daily to pheasant hunting throughout the season.

Please check with the individual property for specific details and regulations on each area.

The 2018 general pheasant season runs from Saturday, Nov. 10 through Sunday, Dec. 23. The daily bag limit is two males per day for the first two days of the season and three males per day thereafter. The possession limit is triple the daily bag limit. Shooting hours are from 8 a.m. to sunset.

Nonlead ammunition is required when hunting pheasants anywhere in the state, except on licensed game bird clubs.

Fall Turkey

The chance to provide a wild turkey for Thanksgiving dinner is strong motivation for many fall turkey hunters. The fall season runs from Saturday Nov. 10 through Sunday, Dec. 9, and – unlike in the spring season – both males and females may be taken. The daily bag limit is one turkey of either sex with a season and possession limit of two birds.

Three subspecies of wild turkeys can be found in California – Rio Grande, Merriam’s and eastern – with Rio Grande being the most widespread. Wild turkeys inhabit most counties in California. Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to sunset.

Nonlead ammunition is required when hunting turkeys anywhere in the state unless the turkey is taken on the grounds of a licensed game bird club.

Second Dove Season

California’s second dove season runs from Saturday, Nov. 10 through Monday, Dec. 24. Although lacking the fanfare and tradition surrounding the Sept. 1 opener, the second season offers cooler weather, fewer crowds and the chance for a mixed bag of species – quail and rabbit, for example – that often share the same habitat.

Limits remain the same as the early season: Mourning dove and white-winged dove have a daily bag limit of 15, up to 10 of which may be white-winged dove. The possession limit is triple the daily bag limit. There are no limits on spotted dove and ringed turtle dove. Hunting for Eurasian collared dove is legal year-round and there is no limit. Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to sunset.

Lead ammunition is permitted for hunting doves in 2018. Nonlead ammunition, however, is required when hunting on all CDFW lands. For more information please see the CDFW nonlead ammunition page.

In addition to public hunting opportunities available at CDFW state wildlife areas and federal wildlife refuges, CDFW offers special hunts at the Upland Game Wild Bird Hunts page and through the SHARE program, which provides public hunting access to private land or other landlocked properties. New hunters should visit CDFW’s Apprentice Hunts webpage for additional pheasant hunting opportunities.

Lake Almanor Receiving 50,000 Trout

Lake Almanor is one of the pristine lakes Northern California anglers dream of fishing at. Located in remote Plumas County, Almanor is an off-the-beaten-path destination that is getting a boost for next season’s trout season courtesy of the Almanor Fishing Association. Here’s some details from the Plumas County News:

That’s all positive because 9:30 a.m. on Oct. 23 and 24, tank trucks from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife started showing up at the boat ramp of Lake Haven Resort to unload 50,000 fertile rainbow trout.

Over 20 AFA members manned the unloading of the trout into a transfer pen, moving them to the holding pens at Hamilton Branch with a pontoon boat and manually moved them into the pens with nets.

Some students from the Feather River College Hatchery Program came up to observe and help out the AFA.

The trout will be housed in the pens, fed daily by more AFA members and ultimately released into Lake Almanor next spring.

 

 

Two Weeks Left To Purchase Your GGSA Salmon Fundraiser Tickets

The following press release is courtesy of the Golden Gate Salmon Association: 

San Francisco – The Golden Gate Salmon Association (GGSA) will host its fifth annual Sonoma Salmon Dinner on Friday, Nov. 9 at Ramekins Culinary Institute. The dinner will honor Sonoma County Water Agency’s General Manager, Grant Davis while raising funds to support GGSA’s work restoring salmon.

The event will be held at Ramekins Culinary Institute, 450 West Spain St, Sonoma.

This year’s event is on the heels of the enormous success of last year’s dinner where over $60,000 was raised with half of it going to local fire relief efforts.

John McManus, president of GGSA said, “We’re honoring Grant Davis because of the great job he’s done of managing Sonoma County’s water resources while protecting salmon and the local watersheds they rely on. We’re also looking forward to coming together to raise money for GGSA’s long-term goal of rebuilding the salmon runs that support coastal communities up and down the coast, including Sonoma County’s.”

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and tickets are $125.00 per seat or $1250 for reserved tables of 10. Tickets are available by calling 855-251-GGSA (4472) or by visiting https://sonoma-salmon-celebration.eventbrite.com or www.goldengatesalmon.org.

The night will feature fresh-caught salmon prepared on the fire pit.   Ted Wilson of and Kyle Kuklewski, of Ramekins will come together to elevate the culinary treats of the evening. Fresh oysters will be provided by Drakes Bay Oyster Company.  Live auction bidders can compete for trips including ocean fishing, an overnight and boat at Caples Lake Resort in the high sierras, Mendocino stay, PlumpJack Squaw Valley overnight and dinner plus other exciting wine lots and fun.

The night will also feature wines, cocktails, silent and open auctions, and the chance to compare fall harvest stories while raising funds to support GGSA’s work to keep abundant salmon stocks in California. Attendees will get a brief update from GGSA on the current state of salmon affairs.

The Golden Gate Salmon Association (goldengatesalmonassociation.org) is a coalition of salmon advocates that includes commercial and recreational salmon fishermen, businesses, restaurants, a native tribe, environmentalists, elected officials, families and communities that rely on salmon. The Golden Gate Salmon Association (www.goldengatesalmonassociation.org) is a coalition of salmon advocates that includes commercial and recreational salmon fisherman, businesses, restaurants, a native tribe, environmentalists, elected officials, families and communities that rely on salmon. GGSA’s mission is to restore California’s largest salmon runs in the Central Valley rivers because they provide the bulk of salmon caught off our coast and inland rivers. We serve the sport and commercial anglers that rely on salmon as a long-term, sustainable resource. Salmon recovery is our passion.

One Dead In Fishing Boat Accident Off San Diego

 

On Saturday I headed down to Fresno to attend my alma mater Fresno State’s Homecoming game. At the tailgate party my friends put on for every home game, I always look forward to talking fishing with our friend Tom (the last game I attended, Tom brought some bluefin tuna he’d caught the previous weekend out of San Diego).

So when I spotted Tom sitting on an ice chest – where my beverages just happened to be – I immediately asked him if he’d fished recently. But Tom had some bad news. “Did you hear about the fishing boat that wrecked out to sea?” he told me.

Sure enough, the San Diego-based fishing vessel Prowler – Tom said one of his buddies had just gone on a trip withthe boat the previous week – collided with a luxury yacht 9 miles out at sea. Here’s more from San Diego’s CBS 8:

A yacht and a sportfisher collided offshore of Imperial Beach, and more than two dozen people had to be taken back to shore, U.S. Coast Guard officials said.

A person aboard the fishing boat had to be airlifted to a hospital, and the 27 others aboard both boats were taken back to San Diego.

Shortly before 8 p.m. Friday, the 332-foot yacht Attessa IV contacted Coast Guard Sector San Diego to report a collision with the Prowler, a 65-foot sportfisher, about nine miles off Imperial Beach, Coast Guard officials said. The collision caused multiple injuries and extensive damage to the starboard side of the Prowler.

Tragically, one of the injured was reported dead by San Diego’s ABC 10. 

Condolences to all the victims.

 

Stretch Of Upper Klamath River Reopens To Chinook Fishing

CDFW photo

 

The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: 

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Iron Gate Hatchery has determined that the hatchery will have taken in more than 8,000 fall Chinook Salmon by the end of this week. According to California 2018-19 supplemental sport fishing regulations, the take of 8,000 fall Chinook Salmon at the hatchery triggers the reopening of the recreational Chinook Salmon fishery between Interstate 5, near Hornbrook, and 3,500 feet below the hatchery.

Recreational anglers will be able to harvest two Chinook Salmon, but no more than one adult greater than 22 inches, per day in this reach. The possession limit is six Chinook Salmon with no more than three adults. Reopening this stretch of the Klamath River is designed to allow anglers to catch surplus hatchery Chinook Salmon now that the number of adult needed for spawning has been achieved at the hatchery.

The lower Trinity River downstream of Hawkins Bar is the other section within the Klamath basin that remains open to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. All other quota areas are closed to the take of adult Chinook Salmon. The take of jack Chinook Salmon, equal to or less than 22 inches, may be taken in all areas of the Klamath basin, with the exception of the mouth of the Klamath River, which is closed for the remainder of the year. The daily bag limit for jack Chinook Salmon in these areas is two fish per day and no more than six in possession.

Anglers may monitor the quota status of open and closed sections of the Klamath and Trinity rivers by calling the information hotline at (800) 564-6479.

For more information regarding Klamath River fishing regulations, please consult the 2018-2019 California Freshwater and Supplemental sport fishing regulations at wildlife.ca.gov/regulations.