Tag Archives: featured content

Fred Hall Shows A Valuable Resource For Hunters

Photos courtesy of Fred Hall

Happy Fred Hall Shows day, Long Beach. The five-day event begins today and runs through Sunday (stop by our California Sportsman booth No. 114). Our friends at the show – let by owner Bart Hall – wanted to let visitors know that there is plenty of space devoted to hunting along with fishing and other activities at this and all the other Fred Hall Shows.

So check our Bart’s piece that’s running in our March issue:

By Bart Hall 

Did you know that at the Fred Hall Long Beach Show, the world’s largest fishing show, you could find a place to hunt for just about any species on Earth? That’s right: hunt at a fishing show. 

According to the surveys that we conduct, most of the attendees at a Fred Hall Show are hunters as well as anglers. And that’s a good thing, because as hunting is represented at all of the Fred Hall Shows, it’s represented in a big way at the Long Beach show, which is March 7-11 at the Long Beach Convention Center. 

You can find folks who will help you with elk hunting, whitetail deer hunting, mule deer hunting, duck hunting, quail hunting, pheasant hunting, dove hunting, goose hunting, wild boar hunting, and even more kinds of hunting. You can find places to hunt all over North and South America and even Africa and New Zealand.

There are over 60 booths dedicated to hunting and the shooting sports. Most of them are located in the part of the main exhibit hall, where the giant Turner’s Outdoorsman display is located. Turner’s will be displaying firearms again this year and will expand that display to the Fred Hall Del Mar Show (March 22-25). The Turner’s stores are out to prove that they are your one-stop hunting and fishing locations in California. 

Also displaying guns and some very impressive mounts is the Oak Tree Gun Club (661-259-7441; oaktreegunclub
 which is one of the most impressive gun ranges in the country. Their pistol range reminds me of an old-time shooting gallery. Of course, the trap and skeet ranges are great, but the thing that blows me away is the sporting clay range. This unbelievable range is set in a natural California oak tree grove with some of the best shooting stations I’ve ever seen. 

Some of the machines that throw the clays are diabolical and extremely fun. Oak Tree will also have information on some great hunting and fishing lodges in their booth, including some African destinations. They’re one of several African outfitters at the show.


A permanent staff of five produces the Fred Hall Shows, featuring Mike Lum, Tim Baker, Katie Hall, Ginny Hall, and myself. We are ably assisted by Dave and Barbie Mandagie, Eric McCauley, Billy and Hunter Trevarainus, Rick Gaskins, Jay Settle, and others. 

All of us hunt or shoot. Mike and Tim each shot elk over the last two years. Our ringtone for Tim is a duck call, because during duck season he’s in a blind somewhere.

The Hall family loves to gather for hunts as well. (Photo by Bart Hall)


So come on down to a Fred Hall Show and talk to some great hunting lodge owners. The variety is amazing and I’m sure you’ll find something you like. You can’t buy guns at Turner’s Outdoorsman or Oak Tree while at the show, but you can compare different firearms and leave a deposit to lock in a show special.

The Fred Hall Shows are the biggest little shooting sports shows in the world. Hunters and shooters are definitely welcome. Join us in Long Beach and Del Mar for our events. CS 

Editor’s note: Bart Hall is general manager of the Fred Hall Shows. For more, check out fredhall.com, like at facebook
.com/TheFredHallShows, and follow on Instagram (@officialfredhallshows).



Wildlife Artists Encouraged To Enter California Duck Stamp Contest

Last year’s first-place duck stamp winning entry. (CDFW)


The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: 

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is seeking talented waterfowl artists to submit their original artwork to the 2018-2019 California Duck Stamp Art Contest. Submissions will be accepted from May 11 through June 11.

The contest is open to U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older as of March 5, 2018. Entrants need not reside in California.

The winning artwork will be reproduced on the 2018-2019 California Duck Stamp. The top submissions will also be showcased at the Pacific Flyway Decoy Association’s annual art show in July.

The artwork must depict the species selected by the California Fish and Game Commission, which for the 2018-2019 hunting season is the brant, a species of goose.

The design is to be in full color and in the medium (or combination of mediums) of the artist’s choosing, except that no photographic process, digital art, metallic paints or fluorescent paints may be used in the finished design. Photographs, computer-generated art, art produced from a computer printer or other computer/mechanical output device (air brush method excepted) are not eligible and will be disqualified. The design must be the contestant’s original hand-drawn creation. The entry design may not be copied or duplicated from previously published art, including photographs, or from images in any format published on the Internet.

All entries must be accompanied by a completed participation agreement and entry form. These forms and the official rules are available online at www.wildlife.ca.gov/duck-stamp/contest.

Entries will be judged at a public event to be held in June. The judges’ panel, which will consist of experts in the fields of ornithology, conservation, and art and printing, will choose first, second and third-place winners, and an honorable mention.

Since 1971, CDFW’s annual contest has attracted top wildlife artists from around the country. All proceeds generated from stamp sales go directly to waterfowl conservation projects throughout California. In past years, hunters were required to purchase and affix the stamp to their hunting license. Now California has moved to an automated licensing system and hunters are no longer required to carry the physical stamps in the field (proof of purchase prints directly onto the license). However, CDFW will still produce the stamps, which can be requested by interested individuals at www.wildlife.ca.gov/licensing/collector-stamps.

Watch Juvenile Chinook Released From Coleman National Fish Hatchery

Hatchery photo by Coleman National Fish Hatchery.


The above (awesome) video is courtesy of Coleman National Fish Hatchery, which last week released more than 200,000 juvenile Chinook salmon into the Sacramento River.

It’s a beautiful night for a fish release. ?

There are over 200,000 winter-run Chinook juveniles being released over the next two days. Hopefully this rain helps them move downstream!

Image may contain: sky, tree, outdoor, nature and water

Ontario Knife Introduces OKC Carter Trinity





The following press release is courtesy of Ontario Knife Company:

Ontario Knife Company® (OKC®) introduces a new knife for 2018 designed by Robert Carter (son of longtime OKC designer Joe Pardue and grandson of legendary designer Mel Pardue) — the OKC Carter Trinity. The collaboration with Carter has produced some of the best-selling OKC knives in recent years, and with good reason – these knives are a perfect blend of form, function and durability. The Carter Trinity is the fruit of this partnership, and is sure to be as desirable as previous releases.

In contrast to other OKC Carter knives, the Trinity features titanium and G10 handle scales. Both materials are extremely strong relative to their weight, and have high corrosion resistance, even in saltwater environments. The two materials also create an attractive, contrasted handle while retaining the Carter line’s famous utility. The end result is an extremely durable knife that is easy to carry on your belt or in your pocket. The stainless steel blade of the Carter Trinity is a 6.86-inch (17.4cm) drop-point designed with a beveled top edge and a Rockwell hardness of 57-59. The blade snaps firmly open and is held by a Titanium lock spring. A Titanium belt clip holds the folded knife securely while being carried.

“OKC continues its collaboration with Robert Carter because our consumers demand the very best knives,” said Ken Trbovich, President and CEO of OKC. “The Carter Trinity is an extremely durable yet convenient to carry knife that fits firmly in your hand while in use, and lightly in your pocket while being carried. We are very proud to continue to work with Robert and feel the Carter Trinity is everything people would expect in an OKC knife.”

The OKC Carter Trinity is made in Taiwan and designed and distributed in the USA.  The OKC Carter Trinity has an MSRP of $89.95.

Founded in 1889, the Ontario Knife Company® is an award-winning knife, cutlery, and tool manufacturer operating out of Upstate New York for over 125 years. OKC® produces a wide range of tools, including cutlery and kitchenware, hunting and fishing knives, machetes, survival and rescue equipment, science and medical tools, and tactical knives. OKC has a long tradition of building knives and tools for the U.S. military, producing high quality equipment that has seen continuous service since WWII. In addition to being a major supplier to the U.S. Armed Forces, OKC leverages a network of distributors, dealers, and major commercial retailers to sell its products nationwide and internationally to over 35 countries. OKC’s custom manufacturing division Jericho Tool®, advances capabilities including a broad-spectrum of injection molding, tool and die, and machining operations to provide white label and OEM manufacturing services for consumer and industrial goods. Collectively OKC’s product lines and manufacturing services reach the house wares, sporting goods, tactical, security, law enforcement & first responders, education, science & medical, and industrial & agricultural industries.

For more information about Ontario Knife Company and its industry-leading line of advanced knives, machetes, edged products and specialty tools, contact Ontario Knife Company at P.O. Box 145-26 Empire Street · Franklinville, NY 14737 · Telephone (716) 676-5527 · Or visit www.ontarioknife.com. The Ontario Knife Company is a subsidiary of publicly traded Servotronics, Inc. (NYSE MKT – SVT).

Trust us when we say there are king salmon migrating to the Sacramento and Feather Rivers. Cooler water temperatures are expected, and especially the Sacramento looks like a decent option to catch ?sh this month. (MSJ GUIDE SERVICE)

Study: Finding Big Chinook Getting Harder

Man holding large fish


A University of Washington study that was published in the journal Fish and Fisheries says that Chinook salmon are getting smaller in size in Alaska and throughout the West Coast. Or at least the big ones are becoming less frequent to find.

Here’s more from the university’s findings:

The largest and oldest Chinook salmon — fish also known as “kings” and prized for their exceptional size — have mostly disappeared along the West Coast.

That’s the main finding of a new University of Washington-led study published Feb. 27 in the journal Fish and Fisheries. The researchers analyzed nearly 40 years of data from hatchery and wild Chinook populations from California to Alaska, looking broadly at patterns that emerged over the course of four decades and across thousands of miles of coastline. In general, Chinook salmon populations from Alaska showed the biggest reductions in age and size, with Washington salmon a close second.

“Chinook are known for being the largest Pacific salmon and they are highly valued because they are so large,” said lead author Jan Ohlberger, a research scientist in the UW’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. “The largest fish are disappearing, and that affects subsistence and recreational fisheries that target these individuals.”

Chinook salmon are born in freshwater rivers and streams, then migrate to the ocean where they spend most of their lives feeding and growing to their spectacular body size. Each population’s lifestyle in the ocean varies, mainly depending on where they can find food. California Chinook salmon tend to stay in the marine waters off the coast, while Oregon and Washington fish often migrate thousands of miles northward along the west coast to the Gulf of Alaska where they feed. Western Alaska populations tend to travel to the Bering Sea.

After one to five years in the ocean, the fish return to their home streams, where they spawn and then die.

Despite these differences in life history, most populations analyzed saw a clear reduction in the average size of the returning fish over the last four decades — up to 10 percent shorter in length, in the most extreme cases.

You can check out the full report here. 

Rare Speces Of Red Fox Captured In NorCal

Red fox photo by CDFW.

The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: 

A Sierra Nevada red fox was captured in Tehama County last month by California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) biologists researching this rare sub-species of red fox.

The 10-pound male fox was captured on national forest land just outside of Lassen Volcanic National Park, near the town of Mineral. The fox was collared and released at the capture location, and CDFW biologists have been impressed by the distances it has regularly been covering despite rough terrain and high elevation.

“The data gathered during the capture and from the tracking collar will provide significant insights into the ecology of these foxes,” said CDFW Environmental Scientist Jennifer Carlson. “We have already been surprised by the large area the fox has been using and the distance it has traveled — it has averaged over seven straight-line miles per day in very rugged terrain.”

While Sierra Nevada red fox historically ranged widely in the upper montane subalpine zones of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade ranges in California, in the past century its abundance and distribution has declined dramatically.

A state-listed threatened species since 1980, the Sierra Nevada red fox has been the subject of intensified study by CDFW over the past decade. The primary objective is to capture and affix GPS tracking collars to foxes to better understand the size and characteristics of the elusive red fox’s home range and habitat use, its denning sites and reproductive rates, and its health and disease ecology.

In 2008, CDFW used scat-detector dogs to survey portions of Lassen Volcanic National Park and the adjacent Caribou Wilderness. From 2009 to 2011, CDFW used trail cameras and hair-snaring devices to survey high-elevation habitats in the Cascade Range from Mount Shasta to Lassen Peak. At that point, foxes were detected solely in the Lassen Peak area, and the population is believed to consist of only about 20 individuals. Efforts to capture and collar them from 2013-2016 were unsuccessful, yet CDFW continued to document red foxes on trail cameras and to collect genetic samples from their scats and hair. CDFW hopes to capture and collar as many as four more red foxes this year.

The Sierra Nevada red fox is a distinct subspecies of red fox that occupies high-elevation habitats in California and Oregon. Other red foxes in California include the Sacramento Valley red fox, which occupies portions of the Sacramento Valley, and non-native red foxes that are widespread in low-elevation habitats.

For more information on the Sierra Nevada red fox, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/mammals/sierra-nevada-red-fox.

The Good And The Bad Of Sac, Klamath River Salmon Projections

Trust us when we say there are king salmon migrating to the Sacramento and Feather Rivers. Cooler water temperatures are expected, and especially the Sacramento looks like a decent option to catch ?sh this month. (MSJ GUIDE SERVICE)


The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: 

Commercial and sport anglers received mixed news today regarding the status of Sacramento River fall Chinook and Klamath River fall Chinook – California’s two largest Chinook salmon populations. While adult returns of both stocks were well below minimum escapement goals in 2017, and projected abundance for both stocks is modest compared to historic averages, state and federal fishery scientists reported an increase in the number of jacks (two-year-old Chinook) that returned to spawn in 2017. Higher jack returns, as seen in 2017, can indicate the potential for increased abundance of adult (three years old or older) Chinook for 2018 fisheries.

Forecasts presented at today’s annual Salmon Information Meeting suggest there are 229,400 Sacramento River fall Chinook adults in the ocean this year, along with 359,200 Klamath River fall Chinook adults. While the Sacramento River fall Chinook forecast is comparable to last year, there are greater numbers of Klamath River fall Chinook projected to be in the ocean in 2018. Fall Chinook from these runs typically comprise the majority of salmon taken in California’s ocean and inland fisheries.

The effects of the recent drought are still impacting California’s salmon populations. Outbound juvenile Chinook suffered unusually high mortality because of low flows and high water temperatures in both the Sacramento and Klamath watersheds in 2014 and 2015. Unsuitable river conditions, coupled with persistently poor ocean conditions during the same period, resulted in very low numbers of adult Chinook returning to spawn in both the Klamath and Sacramento River basins in 2017.

Over the next two months, the Pacific Fishery Management Council will use the 2018 fall Chinook ocean abundance forecasts, in addition to information on the status of endangered Sacramento River winter Chinook, to set ocean sport and commercial fishing season dates, commercial quotas and size and bag limits.

At the same time, fishery managers with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will be working to develop a suite of recommendations for the California Fish and Game Commission (FGC) to consider on 2018 fishing seasons, size limits and bag limits for Chinook salmon river fishing in the Klamath/Trinity and Sacramento River basins. For more information, please visit the FGC Sport Fishing Regulations website.

For more information on the process for setting the California ocean salmon season or for general information about ocean salmon fishing, please visit the Ocean Salmon Project website. For the latest ocean salmon season regulations, please call the CDFW ocean salmon hotline at (707) 576-3429 or the National Marine Fisheries Service salmon fishing hotline at (800) 662-9825.

For the latest inland salmon season regulations in the Klamath/Trinity basin, call (800) 564-6479, and in the Central Valley, please visit the CDFW Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulations website.

Grants Established To Help Hispanic Families Enjoy The Outdoors


The following press release is courtesy of the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation:

Today, the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF) and the George H.W. Bush Vamos A Pescar™ Education Fund announced the grantees for 2018, marking the third round of grants for the Education Fund. The grantees will work to bring fishing, boating and conservation experiences and education to Hispanic families in six states.

A total of almost $160,000 in funds will be provided for 15 fishing and boating programs in California, Florida, Iowa, Nebraska, Pennsylvania and Virginia, including nearly $78,000 in grant funds from RBFF’s George H.W. Bush Vamos A Pescar™ Education Fund. The six state agencies are fully-matching the grant funds, effectively doubling the funds for the 2018 grantees.

“The future of fishing and boating depends on engaging younger, diverse audiences. We’re happy to provide such an amazing opportunity to help organizations in reaching the Hispanic market,” said RBFF President and CEO Frank Peterson. “And with state agencies matching the funds, the impact of each program is effectively doubled.”

Grants were awarded to six state agencies to sub grant to the following 15 local organizations:

California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Nebraska Game and Parks Commission

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission

Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries

“Emerging audiences, like Millennials and Gen X-ers are increasingly diverse, and the Hispanic population is expected to reach 65 million individuals by 2020,” added Peterson. “With this in mind, it’s imperative that our industry reach out to and include the Hispanic audience in marketing messages, communications and imagery.”

In 2014, Bass Pro Shops Founder and CEO Johnny Morris donated $125,000 to RBFF to start an Education Fund in honor of his friend, President George H.W. Bush’s 90th birthday. Soon after the George H.W. Bush Vamos A Pescar™ Education Fund was launched, other companies have come on board with their financial support. The Education Fund carries out its mission of engaging Hispanic families across the United States in fishing and boating through hands-on experiences and conservation activities.

More information about the George H.W. Bush Vamos A Pescar™ Education Fund is available at takemefishing.org/educationfund. Learn more about how you or your organization can donate to the fund here.

Lower American River’s Nimbus Basin Closed To Fishing

Photo by Bureau of Reclamation

The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife: 

The Nimbus Basin on the lower American River will permanently close to all fishing as of March 1, 2018, as per fishing regulations amended by the Fish and Game Commission in December 2017.

The closure will take effect from Nimbus Dam on the lower American River to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gauging station cable crossing approximately one-half mile downriver (California Code of Regulations Title 14, sections 7.50(b)(5)(A) and (B).

Under current regulations, the American River from Nimbus Dam to the Hazel Avenue bridge piers is open to fishing all year (CCR Title 14, section 7.50 (b)(5)(A)), and from the Hazel Avenue bridge piers to the USGS gauging station cable crossing about 300 yards downstream from the Nimbus Hatchery fish weir from Jan. 1 through Aug. 15 (section 7.50(b)(5)(B)).

Closure of the Nimbus Basin to fishing is part of the Nimbus Hatchery Fish Passage Project, which involves reorienting the hatchery’s fish ladder into the Nimbus Basin and removing the existing fish weir. This project will create and maintain a reliable system of collecting adult salmon and steelhead broodstock for the hatchery and increase the amount of natural spawning and rearing habitat available in the lower American River.

The changes will also minimize American River flow fluctuations associated with installation and removal of the hatchery’s weir and eliminate health and safety concerns relative to the deterioration of the existing weir structure. The new spawning habitat opened up by the permanent removal of the weir will improve juvenile salmon production and increase harvest opportunities downstream.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife completed a joint Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIR/EIS) for the Nimbus Hatchery Fish Passage Project in 2011. Planning is currently underway and construction is scheduled to begin in federal fiscal year 2019. The EIR/EIS is available for download fromwww.usbr.gov/mp/ccao/hatchery.

Trophy Trout Fishing Opportunities Abound

Photo by CDFW

The following press release is courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife:

Every year, California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) trout hatcheries release trophy-sized trout to approved waters for public recreational angling and a chance to “catch a big one”! Trophy trout are categorized by CDFW as larger than 2.99 pounds each, but can be much larger. Another category of large trout released by CDFW each year is “super-catchable,” which are fish between 1.1 and 2.99 pounds each. Some of these large fish are raised specifically to provide public anglers with a chance to catch a big one, and others are released to approved waters once they have fulfilled their role in providing fertilized eggs for populating fish of all life stages in CDFW’s statewide program of trout hatcheries.

trophy trout 1
Trophy trout. CDFW file photo

Trophy and super-catchable trout require more resources than catchable-size trout. Younger trout (fingerling to catchable size) grow quickly and efficiently convert fish food to body size, and that efficiency drops with age. By weight, 93 percent of all trout released by CDFW trout hatcheries are in the “catchable” size category (most often 1/2 pound fish, or approximately 12 inches in length). In 2018, approximately 100,000 pounds of trout released for public recreational angling will be in the trophy or super-catchable size.


The following locations are scheduled for trophy and super-catchable size trout releases in 2018:

Northern Releases

  • Hat Creek, Shasta County (late April to early May)
  • Burney Creek, Shasta County (late April to early May)
  • Baum Lake, Shasta County (late April to early May)
  • Iron Canyon Reservoir, Shasta County (May)
  • Browns Pond, Modoc County (May)
  • Rainbow Pond, Modoc County (May)
  • Ash Creek, Lassen County (May)
  • Shasta Lake, Shasta County (May through August)
  • Lake Siskiyou, Siskiyou County (May through August)
  • Juanita Lake, Siskiyou County (May through June)

North Central Releases

  • Red Lake, Alpine County (May)
  • Indian Creek Reservoir, Alpine County (May)
  • Sawmill Pond (children’s fishing pond), El Dorado County (May)
  • Pillsbury Reservoir, Lake County: (May)
  • Various locations for Kid’s Fishing Day events (November through May)

Central Releases

  • Kern River, Tulare County (February through April)
  • Kings River, Fresno County (January through April)
  • Stanislaus River, Tuolumne County (June and July)
  • Pinecrest Lake, Tuolumne County (June and July)
  • Shaver Lake, Fresno County (February through March)

South Coast Releases

  • Pyramid Lake, Los Angeles County (November through May)

Inland Deserts Releases

  • 35 waters in Inyo and Mono counties, including but not limited to Bishop Creek, Bridgeport Reservoir, Convict Lake, Diaz Lake, Ellery Lake, the June Lake Loop, Lake Sabrina, Lee Vining Creek, Lundy Lake, the Mammoth Lakes, the Owens River, Pleasant Valley Reservoir, Twin Lakes Bridgeport, Rock Creek Lake, Saddlebag Lake, South Lake, Tioga Lake, Virginia Lakes and the West Walker River (March through September)
  • Silverwood Lake, San Bernardino County (November through May)
  • Trophy fish are regularly added to weekly plants of regular sized “catchable” fish in Inyo and Mono counties.
  • The trophy sized fish are tagged for identification as originating from CDFW hatcheries and released to approved waters determined to have the ability to sustain the larger fish.
  • Trophy fish will be stocked in Diaz Lake for the early trout opener and in Pleasant Valley Reservoir and in Owens River Section II for the Blake Jones Derby.
  • Trophy fish have been stocked in Pleasant Valley Reservoir, Owens River Section II, Owens River below Tinemaha and Diaz Lake since January and these waters will continue to receive trophy fish over the next few months.

Updated information on trophy and super-catchable trout releases for recreational angling is released early each calendar year and will be posted to the CDFW fish stocking website (http://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FishPlants/). Anglers can also call the following lines for region-specific information:

  • Northern Region: (530) 225-2146
  • North Central Region: (916) 351-0832
  • Central Region: (559) 243-4005, ext. 183
  • South Coast Region: (855) 887-1275
  • Inland Deserts Region: (855) 887-1275

CDFW trout hatcheries are dedicated to providing millions of additional trout angling opportunities in approved, public waters throughout the state every year, using the best available science, and ecological, hatchery and resource management principles.